Category Archives: Business

India, an Underappreciated Superpower?

With a population of 1.2 billion, it’s hard to imagine that India is being overlooked as a global power. However, many people don’t realize that India’s population is projected to exceed China’s by 2030; nor do they realize that McKinsey estimated India’s middle class is 300 million, and expected to double by 2030. Furthermore, India’s industry & economy is already greater than most nations, apart from the EU, US and China. (As calculated by CIA World Fact Book GDP Purchasing Power Parity.) The business landscape in India has been difficult to track, but there are now detailed reports to research India’s industries in the low-tech manufacturing and services sectors.

 

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Are we ALL the 1 percent?

Despite confusion of the Occupy Wall Street protests, they have a point. For those who would like some facts, here they are:

According to the CIA World Fact Book rank of income inequality, the U.S. is slightly better than in Bulgaria, but we’re worse than Iran, China, and Russia.  As a democracy, that should be embarrassing.

Here’s how income is actually distributed nowadays:

If you’re one of the peons in light blue, don’t feel bad, because you’re STILL at the tops from a global perspective. According to the Global Rich List, a salary of just $35,000 will place you squarely in the Top 5%. Starting to feel like a greedy ne’er-do-well? You can give a donation to help someone truly in need.

$35,000 Income Puts you in the TOP 4.62%

How to Partner with a Large Corporation

Congratulations! Your startup is in the final negotiations with a large corporation for a joint venture. Except now they’re asking you to foot the (marketing) bill. It’s becoming less and less clear what they’re bringing to the table. But you’ve been pinning your hopes on this partnership, so it must be a good thing, right?

Here are some considerations.

Joint Marketing:

  1. Have company leverage existing resources/capacity (e.g., marketing people, graphic design) to reduce outside vendor costs
  2. Design the ramp-up period  (i.e., pilot) with testing/analytics to improve campaign efficiency.

Competition:

  1. The danger of working with a Goliath is that they often have the ability to squash you. Make sure your service maintains a competitive advantage so they won’t want to drop you in favor of another partner (or in-house solution)
  2. There are plenty of examples of large corporations considering partnerships, getting lots of inside information, and then deciding to do it themselves without the partner. Prevent this by focusing on the benefits / final outcome, rather than on the details of execution

How to Make a Bad Idea Good (or at least less bad)

I’ve been reading a lot of pitches lately, and many are obviously ill-fated. Here are some themes that would benefit most of them:

1) Cut the budget in half. Costs will be higher than expected, and returns will be lower than expected. Inflated numbers won’t fool anyone.

2) Plan the project in multiple phases. Then focus on phase 1 – it should make sense on its own.If it’s only value comes from the success of future phases, then that’s a problem.

3) If you can’t even explain it clearly, then what chance does it have of actually working? Simplify.

4) Money does not equal marketing does not equal success. There is often low correlation between each.

5) Time is not money. Spend the time, don’t spend the money. If your team doesn’t have the in-house capabilities, then it’s not the right team for the project.

6) Experience matters – but experience doesn’t matter. Past successes are great, but what’s even better is experience that will help with the current idea.

7) Think small – but be ready for success. How will the idea scale if it turns out to work?

8) How will it fail? How long will it take? How much will it cost? Will there be any salvageable value?

The Largest Computer Hardware Business on the Planet

Mr. Hurd will bring his expertise running the largest computer hardware  business on the planet to Oracle, where he may be able to revive the fortunes of Sun’s products at H.P.’s expense.

Who do you think wrote that statement? It sure sounds like a press release from Oracle. But it comes from the pen of Ashlee Vance at the New York Times. Does Ashlee even read what he copies and pastes?

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/07/technology/07oracle.html?_r=1&hpw

@BPGlobalPR – PR, BP, and Twitter Converge

Follow a few basic rules of PR, throw millions of dollars at a problem, and it will go your way, right?

A crash course in PR from @BPGlobalPR:

1. Acknowledge the problem without acknowledging specifics. This was our very first tweet:

@BPGlobalPR: We regretfully admit that something has happened off of the Gulf Coast. More to come.
2. Be open about one piece of bad news and no more. You want to appear human, but you don’t want to appear like a bunch of idiots. There’s another word I’d use there, but I don’t think I can. It rhymes with mickleticks.

@BPGlobalPR: Sadly we can no longer certify our oil as Dolphin Safe.3. Threaten legal action if anyone crosses a line. You’re in PR, but you need to make sure you flex your muscle and establish some ground rules.

@BPGlobalPR: Please do NOT take or clean any oil you find on the beach. That is the property of British Petroleum and we WILL sue you.

View the rest of the tips here.

Inc Magazine: Best Industries for Starting a Business

Inc Magazine article highlighting 16 industries for starting a business. A few of the industries are a little goofy (e.g., selling homemade goods online and sperm banks), but others come from the just-released Top Industry data from AnythingResearch.com. Cool, huh? There are certainly a lot of other factors that go into identifying venture opportunities, but many of these  less well-known industries are worth looking at.